Tuesday, September 13, 2005

astrology and the tenth planet

The name for the tenth planet still has not been confirmed. There has been speculation surrounding both Lila and Xena as possible names, but according to Michael Brown neither of those names has been chosen.

For years, many astrologers have said that when a planet is discovered beyond Pluto it will be named PanHorus. Based on what I've been reading about the planet, it seems like there's a good chance that either Pan or Horus will be chosen as the name. Not sure if both names will be chosen, though. We shall see.

Meanwhile, astro.com has a provisional ephemeris up on their site for the tenth planet.


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5 comments:

Anonymous said...

I'm really enjoying your blog! Keep up the good work.

Dak-Ind said...

so this is a dumb question sure, but does an extra planet not totally screw up astrology? be like "well planet x was actually in your jupiter the whole time, so all those positive things we siaid before... you can flush those" or how does that work?

Wendy said...

Thanks, anonymous!! Glad you like it :)

Dak-Ind, the short answer is no, it doesn't screw up astrology. The somewhat longer answer is that, in astrology, discovering a new planet is like discovering a missing link. It adds new layers of meaning to a person's chart. For example, if the new planet makes a negative aspect to Jupiter, while all the other aspects before were positve, it may explain why that person sabotages their good fortune. It's a little more complex than that, but then this would become the incredibly long answer ;) Hope that answers your question!

zandperl said...

Could you predict a new planet's name from the "missing links" in someone's chart? Also, what if astronomers decide Pluto isn't a planet? I've read that Ceres (asteroid) was considered a planet for a while, and that some astrologers include it in their calculations.

Wendy said...

Could you predict a new planet's name from the "missing links" in someone's chart?
No. One person's chart wouldn't provide enough info.

Also, what if astronomers decide Pluto isn't a planet? I've read that Ceres (asteroid) was considered a planet for a while, and that some astrologers include it in their calculations.
There are many asteroids that some astrologers include in their calculations, like Vesta, Chiron, and, like you said, Ceres. I think some are starting to include Sedna, too. There are different schools of thought (and much debate) on the usefulness of asteroids in a chart. I don't include them because I feel like they don't have the same impact on our collective conscious and unconscious the way planets do. When Neptune, Uranus, and Pluto were discovered, there were corresponding shifts in the world that don't seem to accompany the discovery of asteroids. If astronomers decide Pluto isn't a planet, I plan to continue using it in my calculations for those reasons. And I will continue to call it a planet out of protest ;)

let me know if you have anymore questions :)